Stone

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  • Opal Polyhedral Dice

    Harlequin Opal Dice

    $161.00$1,231.00

    Harlequin Opal Dice

    $161.00$1,231.00

    Named for the unique coloration found in Harlequin Opals, these dice have the same intensely iridescent play of color from their namesake.

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  • Malachite Dice with Copper

    $84.00$428.00

    Malachite Dice with Copper

    $84.00$428.00

    Malachite has been mined since the 3rd millennium B.C. and smelted for its copper content. That copper is what gives Malachite its noted green coloration. Ancient Egyptians associated its green color, known to them as wadj, with rebirth and fertility. They believed that the afterlife contained an eternal paradise know as the “Field of Malachite”. Malachite, like Azurite and Lapis Lazuli, has been used as a pigment since antiquity, though it has more recently been replaced by its synthetic counterpart. Malachite is the second of the two copper carbonate minerals and results from the weathering of Azurite, which is why they are often found in deposits intermixed with one another. Both were melted down for the copper ore in antiquity, so it is fitting that we inlay these dice with Copper numbers.

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  • Azurite and Malachite Dice with Copper

    $84.00$428.00

    Azurite and Malachite Dice with Copper

    $84.00$428.00

    These particular dice are made from a blend of Azurite and Malachite then inlaid with Copper. Azurite and Malachite are often found in nature together. Both minerals are the result of oxidized copper orders. And both minerals have been mined since ancient times. Pliny the Elder listed Azurite under the Greek name κυανός roughly translated as deep blue, this word is also the root of the English word cyan. In antiquity Azurite was used as a blue pigment. It was used as a far back as 2600 B.C. in Egyptian art work as well as being used in Japanese works after being heated to produce a deep blue similar to ultramarine which is derived from the much more expensive Lapis Lazuli. Azurite is unstable when exposed to air and moisture and will morph over time to Malachite, which limited is usefulness as a blue pigment. Though many colors were developed in the middle ages using Azurite as a base ingredient. When mixed with certain oils it will form greens and even grey-green tones with combined with egg yolks. Azurite was also used to develop a wide range of blue pigments from Azurro Della Magna to Aremenian Stone Blue.

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  • Charoite Dice Inlaid with Bronze

    $84.00$428.00

    Charoite Dice Inlaid with Bronze

    $84.00$428.00

    These particular dice, have been crafted from Charoite and inlaid with Bronze. Charoite is lavender to purple in color and forms in unusual swirly patterns. Also called Lilac Stone, Charoite is thought to have been discovered in 1940 along the Chara river in Siberia, but did not gain in popularity until the late 70’s. Charoite is found in massive formations in limestone deposits along with tinaksite and canasite formations. To say that Charoite is complex stone is an understatement. It is described a hydrated potassium, sodium, calcium, barium, strontium, and silicate hydroxyfluoride. Charoite is widely used in cabochon work as well as carved in to decorative objects. Thanks to the size of its natural formations Charoite is carved in to a variety of objects from small figurines to large urns like you can see below.

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  • Jade Dice Inlaid with Brass

    $84.00$428.00

    Jade Dice Inlaid with Brass

    $84.00$428.00

    These particular dice, have been crafted from Jade and inlaid with Brass. Chinese craftsmen have crafted highly prized works of art from Jade for thousands of years. In fact the earliest known Chinese jade artifacts date to the Late Neolithic Era around 3300 BC. There are artifacts that predate even this as Jade was fashioned into tools by early man much like flint. A few hundred years ago, some of these master craftsmen in China recognized that Burmese Jade was different. It was harder, more dense, and produced a higher luster upon polishing. This Burmese Jade gradually became the preferred Jade of these Chinese artisans, and the type of Jade most highly prized by the Chinese people.

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  • Lapis Lazuli Dice with Nickel Silver

    $84.00$428.00

    Lapis Lazuli Dice with Nickel Silver

    $84.00$428.00

    Made from Lapis Lazuli and inlaid with Nickel Silver. First mined around 7,000 B.C., Lapis Lazuil’s deep blue coloration was the very first blue pigment known to man. Artists from Ancient Egypt to the Renaissance prized it’s Ultramarine blue color. That name comes from the Latin ultramarinus, which translates, “beyond the sea”, owing to the pigment being imported from Afghani mines during the 14th and 15th centuries by Italian traders. This made Lapis Lazuli highly sought after and demanded correspondingly high prices. Artists reserved this bluest of pigments for their best works and it was commonly used to depict the robes of angles or the Virgin Mary. Where as the Ancient Egyptians used the stone to adorn the tombs of Pharaohs. Fun fact, Lapis Lazuli smells faintly of acrid sulfur when worked not too dissimilar from asphalt

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